Egészségedre: Buda and Pest

A Rainy Day in Paris

I spent one day in Paris en route to Budapest.  It was, how do you say, a Rainy Day in Paris.  True fact: speaking Spanish with a French accent is French.

Rainy Day in Paris

Just another photograph I took in the rain

I have heard the theory that before you arrive in a country, you should know how to say “hello” and “I’m sorry”.  Seems like a good start.  In Hungarian, hello is hello as well as goodbye.  That’s where simplicity ends.  I still don’t know how to say I’m sorry.  When I asked the waiter on our first night how to say “cheers” in Hungarian, he grew a snotty smirk and spat out this five syllable gem: egészségedre.

Budapest was a welcome “vacation from the vacation”.  I was living luxury style in the Hotel Zichy Palazzo (or Enrico Palazzo as I like to call it).

The three of us in front of the Zichy statue

The three of us in front of the Zichy statue

Wednesday, September 16 – Printa Cafe, Budapest

We saw so much in Puda and Pest – mostly Pest.  Special thanks to our buddy Rick Steves.  I adapted to a new way of travel with this new voice in the mix: the guide book.  Here’s what we covered with his help:

Monday – opera house, parliament, boat tour of Danube – Buda + Pest.  Dinner: Russian spot – duck “p” word, dumplings

Tuesday – Castle Hill, WWII hospital, Szechenyi baths.  Dinner: Museum – veal in paprika sauce, Bulls Blood blend, apricot brandy

Wednesday – Jewish quarter, great synagogue, Jewseum, lunch, cafe – here I am.  Opus!

Carol – Hopefully you have more to your food notes than I do.  Duck “p” word?

Dad and the piano player share the same “low profile” hat. Dad puts his on when he doesn't want to be recognized as an American tourist (I can't imagine this ever worked), while the piano player put his on in order to channel his alter ego for a quick solo jaunt on the ivories before calling the band up for the second set. This guy was a real comedian judging by the crowd's reaction to his Hungarian monologues between songs.

Dad and the piano player of this Soviet Underground Jazz share the same “low profile” hat. Dad puts his on when he doesn’t want to be recognized as an American tourist (I can’t imagine this ever worked), while the piano player put his on in order to channel his alter ego for a quick solo on the ivories before calling the band up for the second set. This guy was a real comedian judging by the crowd’s reaction to his Hungarian monologues between songs.

Love birds with Parliament

Love birds with Hungarian Parliament

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s